The Five Essential Functions of the Marshall/Ranger Pt. 1

0

We can’t say it enough; you are the front line of our golf operation, the eyes and ears of Lonely Pine Golf Club. By being customer-focused, you can and will make a difference in every customer’s day.

We need your help and effort to give that to our customers, day in and day out. When you follow our systems and memorize the scripts we provide you in them, you will play do your part in making our customer’s experience a memorable one.

I) Provide Excellent Customer Service: You hear about customer service every day and customer service is what sets us apart from our competition.

II) Sales: Don’t worry we don’t expect you to sell memberships. We just want you to help us by keeping your ears open and letting customers know about the advantages of Lonely Pine membership.

III) Maintain Flow of Play: As a fellow golfer and as Marshall/Ranger you know how important this is for every customer’s enjoyment.

IV) Enhance Course Safety by Enforcing Rules and Regulations: A safe course makes for an enjoyable day.

V) Course Maintenance: We always need to look our best. Now, let’s take a look at each of these essential functions.


 

I) Provide Excellent Customer Service

Think of yourself as the course’s Goodwill Ambassador! By remembering to be friendly and courteous while directing play and enforcing course rules and regulations, you’ll do your part in helping make our customers experience a positive one.

As a Ranger, there are many different ways in which you can show that “We care about our customers.” Here are some of the ways you can shine as the course’s Goodwill Ambassador:

Greet all Customers and Thank Them for Playing

Since our customers are also our guests, every time you see one on the course, wave. This simple gesture will make our players feel welcome and will also let them know you are here to help them.

Approaching a Player or Group

As you know, there are many different reasons for approaching a player or group. Please keep the following in mind whenever you interact with our customers:

First Time Approaching a Player or Group

The first time you come up to a group or an individual player is a great time to help them understand how much you care. Do this by saying, “Welcome to Lonely Pine Golf Club. My name is _______ the Course Ranger for this morning/afternoon.”

Pause for a moment and see if they would like to introduce themselves. If they do, try to remember at least one or two names.

After you pause let them know, “I’m here in case you need any help.”

Wait for a moment to see if they have any comments or concerns. If they have any handle their concern/issue (see Concerns/Issues Reported by a Player) then tell them, “Please feel free to wave me down if you need anything.”

Note: If the player(s) tells you their name(s) write them down on your tee sheet beside their group’s tee time. Since everyone likes to hear their name, whenever possible, try to call the player(s) by name. It’ll make them feel good and can be very useful if you ever have to talk to him/her about speeding up play, course rules, etc.

Approaching a Player or Group (other than the first time of the day)

If you approach a group for whatever reason after you have personally greeted them that day, if at all possible, try to call the player or one group by name. Then reintroduce yourself, “I’m _______ the Course Ranger for this morning/afternoon. How are you Mr./Ms. _______”?

Then as friendly as possible explain to them why you are there, “One of the players in the group ahead seems to have lost their putter. Did you see a putter on the last hole?”

Wait for their response and then thank them, “Thanks for your help.”

Leaving a Player or Group

Whenever you leave a player or group, leave them with a great feeling about you and Lonely Pine by telling them, “Thanks for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club!”

Concerns/Issues Reported by Player

When a customer comes to you with an issue or a complaint it’s important that you show that you care. You can do that by saying, “Thank you for bringing that to my attention. I’ll look into that right away.”

Five Step Method for dealing with customer complaints/issues

Here are a few guidelines for helping you with deal with customer complaints/issues:

Step 1. Listen attentively, sincerely, and patiently. Listening, more than anything else you can do, shows you care. Often you’ll find that just listening is exactly what the customer needed.

Step 2. Because of the nature of your position there will be times when the customer will be agitated. The best rule of thumb is to remember they are not mad at you they are mad at the situation. Stay calm and never argue with the customer. It’ll make your job much easier.

Step 3. If a customer has an issue and complains, write it down! If you write it down in their presence it shows that you are listening.

Step 4. It almost goes without saying that as our Goodwill Ambassador we need you to use your best judgment to resolve the problem to the customer’s complete satisfaction. That leads us to step five.

Step 5. If you can’t provide the customer with complete satisfaction, call upon your manager for assistance. This also applies on the rare occasion where golfers who will not cooperate with your directions.

Remember: Treat customers as your friend rather than as a stranger.

Dealing with Service Issues Service

issues can be anything from a customer wanting a drink to a dog darting in and out of the fairway.

As our Goodwill Ambassador, if the customer has a service issue, we need you to try to resolve it immediately, no matter how trivial the issue may seem. Here’s how:

Let’s use the example of a player telling you that he needs a drink and complains that the beverage cart hasn’t been around all day. As you are listening put a Customer Service Improvement Form on the top of your clipboard and begin writing down her complaint. When she finishes telling you about her issue tell her, “I’m going to report this to management right away and get someone to help you with this. Is there anything else I can do for you right now?”

If the customer says, “No, that’s it.”

Now, show them how much you care by immediately reporting the issue to the Golf Shop in the presence of the customer.

When you are done reporting the issue, thank them for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club. “Thanks for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club!”

When you ask if there are other issues, if the customer says yes merely follow the same process until you have captured ALL the customer’s complaints.

Dealing with Issues with another Player or Group of Players

Sometimes issues have to do with other players or groups of players. This can range from a group hitting into the group in front, to loud unacceptable, obnoxious behavior. If the customer does have an issue with another player or group of players, try to resolve it immediately no matter how trivial the issue may seem. Here’s how:

Let’s take the example of a complaint about a player cursing so loudly it is disturbing Group A’s play. As you are listening to the complaint take out an Incident Report Form and tell the customer, “I will talk with the player/group immediately and I’ll get back to you shortly. I’m also going to note your complaint. Is there anything else I can do for you right now?”

If the customer(s) says, “No, that’s it.”

Thank them for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club. “Thanks for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club! I’ll be back shortly.”

Approach the other player/group (group B) and tell them about the issue by saying, “Gentlemen the group in front are concerned about someone in your group swearing so loudly it’s disturbing their game.”

Allow the player(s) to give their side of the story. If the one of the players says, “Oh that was me. I’m sorry I was stung by a wasp.” In this case you would ask the player if he needed first aid. Then you would tell them, “Thanks for your help. We want everyone to enjoy himself or herself today. Is there anything I can do for you before I return to the other group?”

Note: If you have not resolved the issue, the person curses at you and tells you to get lost, for your own safety and to create a positive atmosphere for the other players on the course, tell them, “Thanks for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club!”

At this point go back to your cart and then contact management for further instructions. If the customer(s) says, “No, that’s it.”

Thank them for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club. “Thanks for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club!”

Return to the first group and tell them what you have resolved. When you finish ask them, “Is there anything else I can do for you right now?”

If the customer says, “No, that’s it.” Thank them for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club. “Thanks for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club!” If the customer says yes, follow the same process until you have captured ALL the customer’s complaints.

Dealing with Maintenance Issues

Let’s use an example of a woman player complaining to you about the cleanliness of a restroom. As you are listening, put a Customer Service Improvement Form on the top of your clipboard and begin writing down her complaint. When she finishes telling you about her issue tell her, “I’m going to report this to management right away. Is there anything else I can do for you right now?”

If the customer says, “No, that’s it.”

Now, show them how much you care by immediately reporting the issue to the Golf Shop in the presence of the customer.

When you are done reporting the issue, thank them for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club. “Thanks for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club!”

When you ask if there are other issues, if the customer says yes, merely follow the same process until you have captured ALL the customer’s complaints.

Sometimes the maintenance issue might be about the turf. In these cases after you take the customer’s complaint call the Golf Shop and ask for maintenance support. If you feel you need to, go ahead and rope off the area.

If you feel our customer’s safety is involved, stay where you are until you receive maintenance support.

Verify Greens Fees

From time to time there may be a situation where you feel that either someone has joined a group or maybe a group has entered the course without checking in with the Golf Shop. Although this is very rare, you do need to utilize the following process if this should happen.

Always wait to validate the green fees while a group is waiting to tee off. Park your cart on the path slightly behind the group and then approach the group from the side. Since this is the first time you’ve approached the group today, tell them, “Welcome to Lonely Pine Golf Club. My name is _______ the Course Ranger for this morning/afternoon. I’m here to help. Could I take a look at your green fee ticket(s) please?”

Check the ticket(s) and tell them, “Thanks! From time to time we check the tickets to help everyone stay with the pace of play.”

If they make a comment or ask why, tell them, “From time to time we check the tickets to help everyone stay with the pace of play.”

Validate the ticket(s) and then mark the hole and time on your tee sheet next to their name(s). When you’re through tell them, “Thanks! Again, my name’s ______. I hope you have a great day here at Lonely Pine Golf Club. Please feel free to wave me down if you need anything.”

If they say they have lost their ticket(s) or if anything seems out of order tell them, “Let me check your tee time with the Golf Shop. Whose name was the reservation in?”

After they give you the name(s) tell them, “I’ll be back in a moment.”

Walk back to your cart and radio the Golf Shop. Verify the group’s information with them. This will include the group’s tee time and the number of players.

If everything is in order, return to the group and tell them, “Thanks, it looks like you’re right on time. Again, my name’s ______. I hope you have a great day here at Lonely Pine Golf Club. Please feel free to wave me down if you need anything. Thanks for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club!”

If everything is not in order, for your own safety and to create a positive atmosphere for the other players on the course DO NOT return to the group. Wait for the Golf Shop to send a manager to help you resolve the issue.

End of Play

At great time to exhibit your Goodwill Ambassador skills is at the end of a group’s play. If you are at the end of the course when a group finishes, you can ask, “How was your game today?” or “How did you hit it today?”

Listen to them and congratulate them for anything they tell you they achieved, “Congratulations on your Eagle on 3!”

Now you can really shine by asking the customer, Is there anything else I can do for you?”

If the customer says, “No, that’s it.”

Let the customers know how much we appreciated them by saying, “Thank you. Come again soon.”

Finally, thank them for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club. “Thanks for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club!”

If the customer has a concern or issue, handle it the same way you would handle any other customer issue or complaint.

Providing First Aid

As a member of the Lonely Pine Golf Club Player Assistance Team, it is vitally important that you have basic knowledge of First Aid. Because we believe so strongly in this, as part of your training you will be assigned to attend a First Aid and CPR class which you must pass.

1) If a player injures himself or herself as a course Marshall/Ranger, you will be expected to provide first aid assistance to players, when possible. You also will be the person in charge until an emergency response team arrives.

2) Because you are a vital part of our team, as a Lonely Pine Marshall/Ranger you must know and understand all of our emergency procedures.

3) To help you need to be prepared so make sure you have your first aid kit on your cart at all times.

4) There are first aid tips in the back of this manual for your reference. There is also a laminated copy on your clipboard for your reference.

Asking a Player to Leave the Course

Although rare, there are times when asking a person or group to leave the course is the appropriate action. These situations must be handled with extreme care both for your safety and the golfing pleasure of those other players on the course.

Actions that might justify expulsion:

The following are reasons for asking a player to leave the course.

1) A player or group of players repeatedly driving a golf ball off the tee into the 4-some in front of them.

2) A player knocking range balls into the water.

3) A player or group of players using loud, vulgar language.

4) A player or group of players on the course that are playing without a paid green fee and refuse to purchase the same.

5) A player or group of players playing another round of golf without purchasing another green fee.

6) A player driving his/her golf cart dangerously without regard for his or her own safety or the safety of other players.

7) A player that indiscriminately throws his golf clubs.

8) A player that repeatedly takes practice swings in a wild and indiscriminate manner that could endanger other players.

9) A player or group of players that vandalize any part of our club’s property.

How to remove a player from the course

Call the Golf Shop. Ask for the Head Pro or the General Manager so that you can verify that the behavior of the problem golfer/group is incorrigible. He will need to know if the problem group has not heeded the second warning (could be the third warning) or in some other manner acted outside golf course protocol.

1. Two people should handle the expulsion, in order that who said what to whom may be corroborated. Normally, this would be you, as a member of the Players Assistance Team and the Golf Pro, each in their own golf cart.

2. Advise the troublesome group that all remedies have been exhausted and that the golfers in their cart(s) must follow the Players Assistance member and Pro to the Golf Shop.

3. Advise the golfers that they will get a full refund. (Ask the golfers for their green fee receipt and file it for your records).

4. If there has been vandalism, or if any of the golfers are intoxicated, green fees will NOT be refunded and the Players Assistance member and Pro should be accompanied by a Police Officer (public intoxication is a misdemeanor).

5. If the players refused to follow remove keys from carts and drive in for further assistance. At this point the golfer or golfers are expelled. They should be escorted to the Golf Shop and be supervised as they leave both the golf course and the parking lot. Expellee’s names should be taken and recorded. The golfer or golfers should not be permitted to return to our course again.


II) Sales

Although we don’t expect you as a Marshall/Ranger to sell club memberships, golf clubs or anything else, there will be times when you’ll need to give your assistance in helping our customers understand the benefits of joining Lonely Pine Golf Club.

1) As our Goodwill Ambassador you will need to read and understand “Defining Our Product.” This will aid you in answering any of these typical questions. If you have any questions about our product knowledge information, or you think there is something we should add, please feel free to let your supervisor know.

2) Anytime a customer asks questions about membership during play, make a note of their name. The best way to do this is by writing it down. Try to provide the name to the Golf Shop at least three holes (if they’re not already on the 16th, 17th or 18th holes) before the end of their round. This will alert the Golf Shop of their interest and allow them to set aside time to talk with the customer if they so desire.

3) If you are at or near the Golf Shop after a player has finished play for the day, and they have expressed interest in club membership, help the customer by walking him/her into the Golf Shop and, if possible, introduce them to the General Manager or Head Professional. Tell them, “Head Professional Name Mr. Jones has just finished playing here today. He told me he’s interested in club membership. Would you be able to help him?”

Note: At this point the General Manager or Head Professional will always say “Yes I’ll be glad to answer Mr. Jones’ questions about club membership.”

After the General Manager or Head Professional takes charge let the customer know one more time how much we appreciate their business by saying, “You’re in good hands with Head Professional Name. Is there anything else I can do for you?”

After the customer says “no” tell them, “Have a great day! Thanks for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club!”


III) Maintain Flow of Play

As you already know, a key role of the Marshall/Ranger is to help all groups at Lonely Pine Golf Club maintain a reasonable playing pace. This benefits ALL of our customers by making their golfing experience a pleasant rather than frustrating one. It also benefits the course by allowing the maximum number of groups play each day.

Please follow these steps to keep play moving throughout the day.

1. As players start to move through the course start to monitor them. Write the time and the hole you firs notice them on your Tee Sheet. We need you to help each group complete their play in four hours or less. Some simple ways of monitoring a group time are: The time it takes to arrive at the first checkpoint.

The time they make the turn

Also you can monitor groups as they finish to make sure they are completing their round in four hours or less.

2. Anytime you interact with a group, encourage play of 4 hours or less.

3. If you come on duty after the course is open, check with the first-shift Marshal about the status of the groups already on the course.

4. Be on the lookout for backups.

Resolving Slow Play is a Three Step Process

As the Marshall/Ranger you will need to help our customers with their rate of play. Here’s a three-step process for helping keep the proper pace of play:

Step 1. If you see a backup, notice slow play or complaints of delay in flow of play. Investigate the backup to find out where it is.

Step 2. Now that you’ve found where the backup is, determine the cause(s) of the delay in flow of play complain.

Step 3. Finally Resolve the causes of delay of play on the golf course. Now that you know what the problem is fix it.

To resolve the cause(s) of slow play, you’ll probably have to do one or both of the following:

a) Communicating with a Slow Playing Group. No matter what, you’re going to have to talk with the group that’s holding up play.

b) Assisting a Slow Player. In order to help everyone have a good playing day you might need to help a slow player speed up their play in a customer friendly way.

Investigating complaints of Delay in Flow of Play on the Golf Course

If you find that play has slowed or you have received a complaint of slow play, the first thing you need to do is investigate, so you can determine where the slowing is occurring.

Determining Causes of Complaint/Delay in flow of Play on the Golf Course

Since you’ve already been writing down the times you’ve noted the groups pass you check your Tee Sheet to find out where the slowing is occurring. Once you locate the group, you’ll need to approach them and let them know (See Resolving causes of delay of play on the golf course).

If you receive a complaint from a group of players about slow play in the group in front tell them, “Let me check their pace of play with the Golf Shop.”

In front of the complaining group call the Golf Shop to check on their actual tee off time and pace of play. This is to demonstrate to the complaining group you are taking their complaint seriously.

If they are out of position say: “They do seem to be a little behind I’ll go and talk with them! In the mean time please give them a little extra time to get out of the way before you hit. Thank you!”

If they are not out of position say: “According to our tee sheets they are not out of position even if they are a little slower than you would like them to be. Please be patient and give them a little more time to get out of the way. Thank you!”

Resolving causes of delay of play on the golf course

Once you locate the slow playing group, your job is to help them catch up and, as our Goodwill Ambassador we need you to do that tactfully. Once you discover the problem call the Golf Shop and check if there was a gap in tee times or some other reason for the problem. If not, use some of the following methods to help them catch up:

1) Give a Ride in Your Cart – When you see a player lagging behind his group give the slow player a ride in your cart. This will generate a lot of goodwill and enable you to talk to the player.

2) Help Find Lost Balls – When you notice a group looking for a ball, stop your cart, get out and actively aid the group in finding the ball. If you don’t find it after a couple of minutes, offer him a jar ball free. This not only speeds up play, but also generates a lot of goodwill. “Mr. Jones it looks like we’re not going to be able to locate your ball. Let me give you this ball on behalf of Lonely Pine Golf Club.”

3) Replace Balls Hit Into Water Hazards – If you see a player hit his ball into the water or discover a player looking for a ball in the water, drive over and, as you would do for any lost ball, offer them a jar ball free.

4) Teach players about the Ready Golf Program -New players, or players that seldom play, don’t hold up play on purpose. Help them with your expertise by explaining to them how to play Ready Golf.

a) Let them know they should try to keep up with the group in front.

b) Explain to them that there is no need to take “honors” on tees, fairways and greens. The best thing they can do is to hit when ready.

c) When they are finishing the hole, it’s best to putt out rather than marking the ball on short putts.

d) So that the game can go on quickly, cart riders should drop players at their ball and continue on to play their own shot.

e) To prevent lost balls, have your group watch all shots.

f) When on the fairway, think ahead. If you don’t know which shot to hit, bring extra clubs.

g) Most of all to play ready golf, the golfer who is ready – plays. This allows for continuous play.

5) Remind them that if the group ahead of them is on the green or beyond, they are holding up play. This is true even if the group behind does not appear to be pushing them.

6) Let them know that on 3-par holes, they can wave up the following group.

7) Let next group play through – If a group had a very bad hole and you’re sure that they won’t fall behind again, let the next group play through.

Communicating with a Slow Playing Group

When you receive a report of a slow playing group and you find you need to talk with the group, courteously ask the players to catch up with the group in front of them. Here’s how:

1. Approach group in question and say, “Good morning/afternoon gentlemen, the Golf Shop has asked me to check on your pace of play. They tell me that according to our sheets you’re a little off. Is there a problem that I can help you with?”

This allows the players the chance to explain special circumstances as to why they have lost position and perhaps provide you with information that will help you make your next decision.

If they say, “Yes” listen to their explanation and then give them some suggestions (see Resolving causes of delay of play on the golf course) to help them pick up their pace.

After you explain how, politely ask them to pick up the pace. “Ok, see if you can pick it up a little then please, I’ll check back with you a little later.”

Remember to always thank them for playing with us, “Thanks for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club!”

If they say NO, politely go straight to the request. “Ok, please see if you can pick it up a little. I’ll check back with you a little latter.

As always remember to thank them for playing with us, “Thanks for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club!” If they say, “Get lost, or words to that effect, I paid my green fee or any type of challenging statement, SMILE and say, “That’s fine I’ll check back with you a little later then. Thanks for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club!”

Note: Never take the bait of a verbal challenge.

2. The 2nd time you have to talk to the same group approach the group and politely say, “Gentlemen you are still a little behind our pace of play. I really need for you to help me out. For the benefit of all the players behind you I must ask that you either:

Pick up the pace at once OR Pick up your balls and skip to the next hole. “Thanks for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club!”

3. The 3rd time you have to talk to the same group, approach the group and politely say, “Gentlemen the Golf Shop as asked me to inform you that you must skip to the next hole to speed up play. Or You can return to the Golf Shop for a refund.”

At this point you need to stay with the group and accompany them to the next tee. After you get them situated tell them, “Thanks for your cooperation and thanks for playing at Lonely Pine Golf Club!”

Assisting a Slow Player

There will be times that you will encounter a really bad player, a beginner or a once a year player who simply cannot hit the ball. We still want to try to help everyone enjoy the game so as Course Ambassador follow these steps:

1. Approach the group and politely say,“Sir/Madam for the enjoyment of everyone in your group and those players behind you, may I suggest that you play from the front markers or start your hole at the 150 yard maker? I am sure you would have a lot more fun!”

2) You can also suggest alternatives for golfers who are unable to keep up because of lack of experience or poor golfing skills. Here a few:

a) Making double par their maximum number of strokes before putting.

b) Allowing the group behind them to play through.

c) Suggesting that they play a best ball format.

Note: If you cannot resolve a problem, or a customer becomes angry, call the Golf Shop and ask for help.


Would you like to learn more about Marshall/Ranger training? Click here

Share.

Leave A Reply